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You are on Sharks page 16

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Contents:  Virtual tour of Shark Museum, North Carolina

VIRTUAL TOUR

PRIVATE SHARK & FOSSIL MUSEUM

of GEORGE POWELL, NORTH CAROLINA

August of 2009, George kindly allowed us to take photos of the entire museum to share with you.  Photo of George with Heidi below:

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and George with Netherlands friends Mark and his son  Luuk showing off one of the teeth George found at the PCS Phosphate mine, and with Laura, Mark's fiancé, who were thrilled to view his special collections.

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He is a National Treasure, due to his attitude towards the preservation of fossils for future generations, the many years he spent collecting the fossils he loves, and his working relationship with the Smithsonian Institute.

A shark all made of fossil shark teeth, framed with more shark teeth.  A gift to George around the year 2000

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A newspaper  article about George and his collection in The Weekly (Washington Post), Arlington Falls Church, 1998

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Another news article about George, and how he shares his knowledge of fossils, using some of his 100,000 fossils from his collection.

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George Powell proudly displays his fossil collection which he acquired over the years.  The news article outlines his life "Letter carrier's hobby turns into historic find"

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Discovery Channel, Destination Store featured George Powell and his collection of shark teeth on display one year.

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George Powell's renowned SQUALODON ASSOCIATED SPINAL VERTEBRAE

(Ancient toothed whale) Squalodon atlanticus/Shark Tooth Whale

This skeleton was reconstructed to show the 20 associated spinal vertebrae as they would have been arranged in life.  Collected over 2 days in Nov. 1990 from the Calvert Formation, a Miocene age sedimentary formation found along the Potomac River in Westmoreland County, Virginia.  It took six months to repair and reconstruct this six foot section of the spine.  The specimen is missing its skull, which may have been 3-4 feet long, and about 4' of tail; so altogeether the whale would have been about 14' in length.

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Drawing of Squalodon, by Jayson Kowinsky

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Squalodon toothed whale teeth, a tray full

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FOSSIL SHARK TEETH - Lee Creek, Aurora NC

RECONSTRUCTED DENTITIONS (i.e. Putting a jaw of teeth back together again in the right spots) - of Isurus xiphodon (Extinct mako), Nototynchus (Cow shark), Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark), Galeocerdo cuvier (Tiger shark), and Carcharhinus sp. (Gray, dusky & bull shark)

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PATHOLOGICAL (deformed) SHARK TEETH

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Fossil Shark teeth - Trays of Auriculatis & Chubetensis, ancestors of the Megalodon

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Just SOME of his collector MEGALODON shark tooth collection

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Fossil Megalodon shark teeth - Trays of Carcharocles Megalodon

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Fossil MAKO shark teeth - Trays of Isurus Xiphodon

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Fossil MAKO shark teeth - Trays of Isurus Retroflexus - Desori - Oxyrinchus - Praecursor

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Fossil SAND TIGER shark tooth trays

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Fossil HEMIPRISTIS SERRA shark teeth (Snaggletooth), trays

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Fossil COW SHARK teeth, trays,  Notorynchus Primigenius

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Fossil SIX GILL SHARK teeth (Hexanchus), trays

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Fossil FALSE MAKO shark teeth - Trays of Parotodus (Benedeni)

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FALSE MAKO SHARK, Pacotodus benedini, Pliocene, Yorktown Formation, Lee Creek

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Fossil THRESHER shark teeth Alopias

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Associated sets of fossil shark teeth in matrix, Morocco

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SEVEN GILL COW SHARK TEETH Notorynchus primigenius, Miocene, Pungo River Formation, Lee Creek Mine, Aurora NC

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SNAGGLETOOTH Shark (Hemipristis serra; Pliocene, Yorktown Formation, Lee Creek

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Fossil MODERN TIGER SHARK, Galeocerdo cuvier, Pliocene, Yorktown Formation, Lee Creek

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Tray of Fossil TIGER SHARK teeth - Galeocerdo - Contortus and Latidens

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Tray of Fossil TIGER SHARK teeth - Galeocerdo (Cuvier & Aduncus)

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Tray of Fossil DUSKY/BULL shark teeth Carcharhinus sp.

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Fossil SHARK VERTEBRAE disks

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SHARK CARTILAGE (jaw fragments)

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 GRAY shark, Carcharhinus sp., Pliocene, Yorktown Formation, Lee Creek

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A selection of fresh (modern, white) shark teeth, including great whites, tiger shark, and six gill shark

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Gypsum/Selenite crystal with a fossil SAND TIGER SHARK TOOTH in it, wow!

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RARE Isurus Xiphodon Shark Dentition

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SHARK TOOTH SETS

9 sets of Shark teeth show a side view of how a row of teeth moves from back to front of the jaw.  Each tooth that grows is 1-3% larger than the tooth in front of it.  Each file (set) is independent of the others and moves up as needed.  The front teeth are called "Functional teeth", all of the others are called "unerupted" or "replacement" teeth.

FOSSIL SHARK TEETH, in sets

Isurus Hastalis (Mako), Notorynchus Primigenius (cow shark), Hemipristis serra (

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FOSSIL MAKO Shark teeth, in sets

Isurus Xiphodon (Mako), Isurus Hastalis (Big-tooth Mako)

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FOSSIL MEGALODON Shark teeth, in sets

Carcharocles Megalodon

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FOSSIL SHARK TEETH

Odontaspis Hope Winkleri (sand tiger shark), Galeocerdo Contorus (Extinct tiger shark),  Carcharhinus leucas (bull shark), Galeocerdo Cuvier (tiger shark) shark teeth

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OTHER FOSSILS
Large fossil CORAL display, and fossil WHALE VERTEBRAE

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Fossil shell collection

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and a well endowed fossil coral that is a sure conversation piece to all visitors

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Seal bone (right humerus and right femur), Yorktown Formation, Pliocene, Lee Creek

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Fossil SEAL and WALRUS bones

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Fossil Walrus tusk (left tusk, female), Yorktown Formation, Pliocene, Lee Creek Mine

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Fossil Walrus tusk, male

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Bitten fossil bones

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Fossil bird bones

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Fossil WHALE TEETH

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Fossil TURTLE parts

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Reptile fossils - ALLIGATOR, TURTLE, CROCODILE

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Porpoise arm bones (Humerus, radius, ulna), Yorktown Formation, Pliocene, Lee Creek Mine

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Fossil PORPOISE & DOLPHIN TEETH

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Fossil PORPOISE & DOLPHIN VERTEBRAE

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Fossil PORPOISE & DOLPHIN JAWS

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FISH fossils

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Fossil FISH JAWS and GILL PLATES

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Fossil FISH TAILS and COPROLITE

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FISH VERTEBRAE

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Extinct EAGLE RAY MOUTH PLATE (Upper teeth), Aetobatus sp., Pliocene, Yorktown Formation, Lee Creek Mine

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Ray Dental plate, Aetobatus sp. Narinari, Yorktown formation, Pliocene, Lee Creek Mine

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STINGRAY MOUTH PLATES - Aetobatus - Myllobatus

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STINGRAY BARBS and SCUTES (back denticles)- Aetobatus - Myllobatus

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Fossil crab  claws

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Fossil crab parts

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Fossil Crabs (Archacplax)

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Crabs Libinia

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Crabs, Cancer

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RARE FOSSIL SEAL VERTEBRAE

A new species, the only type of bone of its kind

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SPERM WHALE, lower central FOSSIL TOOTH

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FOSSIL WHALE SKELETON

Aurora Fossil Fair, May, 2010

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The highlight of the show for us was having George invite us to see the fossil partial whale skeleton he was working on.   It came to the Aurora Museum from a private home.   The person, a dragline operator at the PCS Phosphate mine who removed it from the mine, had passed away.  The family then brought it to light.  It consisted of ribs and vertebrae.  The drag operator had made a 1/2" steel plate frame around it.

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George estimates the sperm whale was 30-40 feet long in its entirety, at an age of 8-12 million years old.  Paleontologists normally use Ear formation to ID the type of whale. 

Another "rock" chuck-full of fossils from the mine (such as shark vertebrae)

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